HELPING ADOLESCENTS MANAGE LOW MOOD AND DEPRESSION DURING COVID-19

Sharing an excerpt from the book I am writing, to be released this year entitled “HELPING ADOLESCENTS MANAGE LOW MOOD AND DEPRESSION DURING COVID-19”.

We are at an exceedingly arduous time; COVID-19 is like an invisible enemy that has taken away all our liberties.  It has, in all ways possible, disrupted our daily lives.  Lockdown measures by governments around the world have changed the way we live.  It is understandable that young people are particularly anxious about what the future holds for them.  Just a couple of months ago, they were looking forward to a summer of fun and relaxation as school was about to end.  Who would have thought that this would happen?

Some of us even experienced a sudden loss of a loved one.  A loved one who, only last Christmas, was full of life, full of dreams for the future.  Some are facing a bleak future and have lost their jobs.  Some lost a loved one and a job. 

While measures are being put in place to ensure the physical well-being of everyone, we must also consider mental health.  There will be any people who will find it difficult to rise from the ashes of COVID-19, young and old, and will probably experience low mood and depression during this pandemic.

Experiencing some difficulty is normal among young people and adults alike.  Adjusting to these circumstances is hard, especially with the speed in which everything happened; nobody among us could prepare for it.   While feeling low and distressed now and then may be common, being at this state every day that lasts for weeks could be a sign of depression.  Either this may have been present even before the pandemic, or it may have developed in the past few weeks. 

Depression is a debilitating mental condition that can affect a young person’s life in all aspects, whether it is at home, school, and friends.  It is a serious condition that needs therapy or other forms of treatment.  For more information about the symptoms of depression, you may contact the New National Center for Mental Health (NCMH) Crisis Hotlines–0917 899 8727.

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